The warning that burns

    Canada could become the first country to require cigarette manufacturers to include on individual cigarettes warnings about the dangers of tobacco consumption, according to a story by Ryan Flanagan at ctvnews.ca.
    The federal government has launched a consultation and one of the most significant ideas being floated in the consultation concerns a possible requirement for ‘smoking causes cancer’ or similar wording to be included on individual cigarettes. Currently, such warnings are required to be placed on or inside cigarette packs.
    ‘There is recent but limited research showing that health warnings placed directly on a product, such as cigarettes, could be effective in making the product less appealing to users,’ a government consultation document reads.
    Rob Cunningham, a senior policy analyst for the Canadian Cancer Society, described the proposal as a ‘logical next step’ for health warning requirements.
    ‘It’s an incredibly cost-effective way to reach every smoker every day with the health message,’ he reportedly told ctvnews.ca.
    But Cunningham sees the proposal as having a benefit also for law enforcement. He said it would make it easier for police to detect illicitly-produced cigarettes.
    Other ideas under consideration include adding brighter colors and eye-catching cartoons to existing warning labels and ensuring the various warnings on each package follow the same theme and deliver the same message.
    Labels might also become mandatory for tobacco products that do not currently carry them, including water pipe tobacco and heated tobacco products.